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1881 Haiphong Typhoon vs. 1970 Great Bhola Cyclone -...
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1881 Haiphong Typhoon vs 1970 Great Bhola Cyclone

1881 Haiphong Typhoon
1970 Great Bhola Cyclone
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1881 Haiphong Typhoon

Total costsN/A
Deaths 300000

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The 1881 Haiphong typhoon was a typhoon that struck Haiphong, in northern Dai Nam (now Vietnam), and the northern part of the Captaincy General of the Philippines (now the Philippines) on October 8, 1881. The typhoon was first detected east of Southern Luzon on September 27, 1881. The typhoon killed about 3,000 people in northern Vietnam, and 20,000 people in the Philippines, making it the deadliest typhoon to hit the country.

Source: Wikipedia
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1970 Great Bhola Cyclone

Total costs450000000
paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid paid
Deaths 500000

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The 1970 Bhola cyclone was a devastating tropical cyclone that struck East Pakistan (present-day Bangladesh) and India's West Bengal on November 11, 1970. It remains the deadliest tropical cyclone ever recorded and one of the world's deadliest natural disasters. At least 500,000 people lost their lives in the storm, primarily as a result of the storm surge that flooded much of the low-lying islands of the Ganges Delta. Bhola was the sixth and strongest cyclonic storm of the 1970 North Indian Ocean cyclone season.The cyclone formed over the central Bay of Bengal on November 8 and traveled northward, intensifying as it did so. It reached its peak with winds of 185 km/h (115 mph) on November 10, and made landfall on the coast of East Pakistan on the following afternoon. The storm surge devastated many of the offshore islands, wiping out villages and destroying crops throughout the region. In the most severely affected Upazila, Tazumuddin, over 45% of the population of 167,000 was killed by the storm. The Pakistani government, led by junta leader General Yahya Khan, was criticized for its delayed handling of relief operations following the storm, both by local political leaders in East Pakistan and by the international media. During the election that took place a month later, the opposition Awami League gained a landslide victory in the province, and continuing unrest between East Pakistan and the central government triggered the Bangladesh Liberation War, which led to a genocide and eventually concluded with the creation of the independent country of Bangladesh.

Source: Wikipedia

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