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1281 Hakata bay Typhoon vs. 2005 Nias-Simeulue...
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1281 Hakata bay Typhoon vs 2005 Nias-Simeulue earthquake

1281 Hakata bay Typhoon
2005 Nias-Simeulue earthquake
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1281 Hakata bay Typhoon

Total costsN/A
Deaths 65000

Informations

The kamikaze (Japanese: 神風, lit. 'divine wind') were two winds or storms that are said to have saved Japan from two Mongol fleets under Kublai Khan. These fleets attacked Japan in 1274 and again in 1281. Due to the growth of Zen Buddhism among Samurai at the time, these were the first events where the typhoons were described as 'divine wind' as much by their timing as by their force. Since Man'yōshū, the word kamikaze has been used as a Makurakotoba of waka introducing Ise Grand Shrine.

Source: Wikipedia
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2005 Nias-Simeulue earthquake

Total costsN/A
Deaths 1313

Informations

The 2005 Nias–Simeulue earthquake occurred on 28 March off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia. At least 915 people were killed, mostly on the island of Nias. The event caused panic in the region, which had already been devastated by the massive tsunami triggered by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, but this earthquake generated a relatively small tsunami that caused limited damage. It was the third most powerful earthquake since 1965 in Indonesia. The earthquake occurred at 16:09:37 UTC (23:09:37 local time) on 28 March 2005. The hypocenter was located 30 kilometres (19 mi) below the surface of the Indian Ocean, where subduction is forcing the Indo-Australian Plate to the southwest under the Eurasian Plate's Sunda edge. The area is 200 kilometres (120 mi) west of Sibolga, Sumatra, or 1,400 kilometres (870 mi) northwest of Jakarta, approximately halfway between the islands of Nias and Simeulue. Seismic recordings give the earthquake a moment magnitude of about 8.6, and effects were felt as far away as Bangkok, Thailand, over 1,000 kilometres (620 mi) away.

Source: Wikipedia

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