HOME
Select category:
Buildings
Select category
NEW
Building 1

Building 2

Cancel

Search in
Building 1

Building 2

Location

Switch location

Ranking
Play

Home
Search
Account

Borgund Stave Church


Height: 43m
Location: Borgund
Year:

New York Times Building


Height: 319m
Location: New York City
Year: 2007
New York Times Building
Rating

Borgund Stave Church
New York Times Building
Change

Borgund Stave Church

Borgund Stave Church
Height43m
Floors
Year
CityBorgund

Informations

Borgund Stave Church (Norwegian: Borgund stavkyrkje) is a former parish church of the Church of Norway in Lærdal Municipality in Vestland county, Norway.

The old stave church is located in the village of Borgund. It was the church for the Lærdal parish (which is part of the Sogn prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Bjørgvin) until 1868 when it was closed and turned into a museum. The brown, wooden church was built in a stave church fashion around the year 1200. It is classified as a triple-nave stave church of the Sogn-type. No longer regularly used for church purposes, it's now a museum run by the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments. It was replaced with the'new' Borgund Church in 1868.

Source: Wikipedia
Change

New York Times Building

New York Times Building
New York Times Building
Height319m
Floors52
Year2007
CityNew York City

Informations

The New York Times Building is a skyscraper in 620 Eighth Avenue, on the west side of Midtown Manhattan, New York City.

Its chief tenant is The New York Times Company, publisher of The New York Times along with the International New York Times, and other papers. The building is 1,046 ft (318.8 m) tall to its pinnacle, with a roof height of 748 ft (228 m), and comprises 52 stories. The building was erected from 2003 to 2007 as the Times' headquarters at a cost of $850 million. The structure was designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop in association with FXFOWLE Architects. Construction was undertaken by a joint venture of The New York Times Company, Forest City Ratner (Forest City Enterprises's New York subsidiary), and ING Real Estate. As of 2018, The New York Times Building is connected together with the Chrysler Building as the eleventh-tallest construction in the city.

Source: Wikipedia