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Statue of Liberty


Height: 93m
Location: New York City
Year: 1875
Statue of Liberty

Arraya Tower


Height: 300m
Location: Kuwait City
Year: 2009
Arraya Tower
Statue of Liberty
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Arraya Tower

Arraya Tower
Arraya Tower
Height300m
Floors60
Year2009
CityKuwait City

Informations

The Arraya Tower is a skyscraper completed in 2009 in Kuwait City, Kuwait. The tower serves as a grade-A office structure. With sixty storeys, and 300 metres high (with a 45-metre spire), the building was the tallest tower in Kuwait until the construction of Al Hamra Tower in 2011. On January 19, 2010, The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) announced that Arraya Tower was the 4th-tallest building completed in 2009. Curtis W. Fentress, FAIA, RIBA, of Fentress Architects, was the principal architect of the building, and Ahmadiah Construction was the primary contractor. The tower complements the existing 130-metre-high Arraya Tower housing offices and the Courtyard by Marriott hotel, as well as the upscale Arraya Shopping Mall and the Arraya Ballroom. Construction on the tower began in February 2005, with occupation scheduled for February 2009. As of August 22, 2008, the tower had been topped out and the superstructure was complete. Exterior cladding, consisting of white marble, green glass and steel rods, was mostly complete. Interior works were well underway and wrapped up in early 2009 in time for the tower's opening.

Source: Wikipedia

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Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty
Statue of Liberty
Height93m
Floors0
Year1875
CityNew York City

Informations

The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World; French: La Liberté éclairant le monde) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York City, in the United States. The copper statue, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, a French sculptor, was built by Gustave Eiffel and dedicated on October 28, 1886. It was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States, and was a welcoming sight to immigrants arriving from abroad. Bartholdi was inspired by French law professor and politician Édouard René de Laboulaye, who is said to have commented in 1865 that any monument raised to American independence would properly be a joint project of the French and American peoples. He may have been minded to honor the Union victory in the American Civil War and the end of slavery. Due to the post-war instability in France, work on the statue did not commence until the early 1870s. In 1875, Laboulaye proposed that the French finance the statue and the Americans provide the site and build the pedestal. Bartholdi completed the head and the torch-bearing arm before the statue was fully designed, and these pieces were exhibited for publicity at international expositions. The torch-bearing arm was displayed at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876, and in Madison Square Park in Manhattan from 1876 to 1882. Fundraising proved difficult, especially for the Americans, and by 1885 work on the pedestal was threatened due to lack of funds. Publisher Joseph Pulitzer of the New York World started a drive for donations to complete the project that attracted more than 120,000 contributors, most of whom gave less than a dollar. The statue was constructed in France, shipped overseas in crates, and assembled on the completed pedestal on what was then called Bedloe's Island. The statue's completion was marked by New York's first ticker-tape parade and a dedication ceremony presided over by President Grover Cleveland. The statue was administered by the United States Lighthouse Board until 1901 and then by the Department of War; since 1933 it has been maintained by the National Park Service. Public access to the balcony surrounding the torch has been barred for safety reasons since 1916.

Source: Wikipedia